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Joyful Service

A healthy community should be characterized by joyful service to others.

Introduction

We are looking at John 13 and drawing out four themes—four pillars of a healthy community. The first week we looked at "Humble Leadership." Each healthy community centered around Jesus needs a team of leaders, who spend their power for the sake of others—out of a secure identity and out of a vision that outlasts their own survival. Without leadership you can't have a healthy community, and without a healthy, humble leader, the community won't be healthy. You need a leader that recognizes and is honest about their power, gets their identity from God, and spends their power for the life of the community.

The second week we looked at "Sturdy Grace," and we saw how each healthy community needs to move from what we called "single-serving grace," which is disposable for one or two instances of pain—once we've experienced frustration or conflict with a relationship we move on, we uproot ourselves. We saw how we needed to move to "sturdy grace," which is deeply rooted in the grace of Christ, and which sees God bring great fruit out of relational failure.

The third week we looked at "Personal Transformation," and we talked about how a healthy community is not huddled around each other's flaws, nor is a healthy community huddled around each other's affirmations, but a healthy community is huddled around the holy presence of God. This community encourages one another to gaze upon, look upon, focus on God's holiness, God's goodness, and in the process confess our sins, confess our flaws, and be changed into the likeness of Christ by the power of God.

Today we're looking at the final pillar, and that is the pillar of "Joyful Service." When we think about joyful service we have a default expectation, and that ...

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Aaron Damiani is the pastor of Immanuel Anglican Church, a church plant in the Uptown neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois. He is the author of The Good of Giving Up: Discovering the Freedom of Lent.

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Purpose

Living as a Servant

A Win-Win Situation

Gaining a biblical perspective on life and death
Sermon Outline:

Introduction

I. Reasonable comfort + fulfilling work = joy

II. A better equation

III. Becoming a servant to meet real needs

IV. An invitation to shared activity

Conclusion