Jump directly to the Content

Skill Builders

Home > Skill Builders

No Notes, Lots of Notes, Brief Notes (pt. 1)

The pros and cons of extemporaneous and manuscript delivery

See theme

The Montagues vs. the Capulets; the Hatfields vs. the McCoys; the House of Lancaster vs. the House of York. Clan spats are not limited to literature, folk lore, or history. Homiletics has its own spat: preaching with a manuscript vs. preaching extempore. Each side has its champions, and each holds its turf with fervor.

This article tries to bring some balance to the spat by adopting Fred Craddock's stance: "Every method pays a price for its advantages. Those who prefer the freedom and relationships available to the preacher without notes will not usually rate as high on careful phrasing and wealth of content. Those who prefer the tightly woven fabric of a manuscript must … accept the fact that a manuscript is less personal and its use is less evocative of intense listener engagement" (Preaching, p. 216).

This article describes the pros and cons of each method, as well as some pointers for each. Before looking at the three methods—no notes, lots of notes, and brief notes—three ...

skill builder Preview

This skill builder is available to PreachingToday.com members only.

To continue reading:

Related articles

No Notes, Lots of Notes, Brief Notes (pt. 2)

The pros and cons of extemporaneous and manuscript delivery

Delivery: Introduction

How do I speak in a way that arrests hearers?

Delivery: Part 1: Workshops

How do I speak in a way that arrests hearers?