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The Healing Power of No

Practicing the Christian act of nay saying.

Introduction

What is a two-letter word that we often don’t like to hear? It is a word you have probably used on your kids, maybe a word used toward your dog, and even to your friends. The word I am talking about is “No.”

When you hear the word “no,” often you are going to associate the word in a negative way. “No” comes out when something bad happens or is something that prevents a bad thing from happening. For a young man asking a girl out on a date, “no” is a bad thing for him. For a parent telling their child “no cookies before dinner” is preventing the child from having a cookie and warning them that it will not be good if they do.

There are a lot of cases where we have been told “no” and did not like it. We probably felt restrained in those times or even rejected. Let’s face it, “no” is not a fun word.

The Bible tells us that God says “no” also, but the difference is God’s “no” is not a rejection or restraining word for us. In fact, it is quite the opposite. When God says “no” there is a healing power to it, because God is saying “no” to the things that would lead us to hurt and despair.

When God says “no,” he also invites us to do the same, he invites us to say “no” to worry, anger, and the world, because when we do it begins healing for true presence and relationship that are found only in God.

So let’s think of what God has said “no” to in your life that has provided healing and what you might need to say “no” to as well.

Saying ‘No’ to Worry, Heals Us for Presence

The Preacher begins Ecclesiastes 9 ...

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Benjamin Fountain is currently the pastor of Lakeview Baptist Church in Lacy Lakeview, TX, where he has served in a multitude of roles since 2016.

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