Jump directly to the Content
Jump directly to the Content

Sermon Illustrations

Home > Sermon Illustrations

Bad Relationships Are Bad for Your Health

Researchers from the University of Utah found there's a price to pay when couples don't get along. 150 husbands and wives were recorded discussing sensitive issues (how money is managed or doing household chores) and found the following:

Women who buried anger rather than speaking out were more likely to succumb to heart disease than wives who were vocal, the study found. And when women became domineering and controlling, rather than seeking consensus, damage was done to husbands' coronary health.

Researcher Timothy W. Smith understood that there will be disagreements in a marriage, but how you handle yourself in resolving disagreements is important. "Can you do it in a way that gets your concerns addressed but without doing damage at the same time? That's not an easy mark to hit."

A British research project yielded remarkably similar results:

After a twelve-year study of British civil servants, most of whom were married, English researchers concluded that those with hostile intimate relationships were 34 percent more likely to experience chest pains, heart attacks, and other heart trouble.

Even after typical contributing factors such as obesity, smoking, and drinking were eliminated from the equation, those in troubled relationships were still at 23 percent greater risk for a heart attack.

"If you have good people around, it's good for your health," said lead researcher Roberto De Vogli. "If you have bad people around you, it is much worse for your health."

Related Sermon Illustrations

Dealing with the Cow-pie-ridden Fields of Marriage

In his book This Momentary Marriage: A Parable of Permanence, pastor and author John Piper offers a memorable analogy for dealing with the highs and lows of marriage:

Picture your marriage ...
[Read More]

Age at Time of Wedding Impacts Marital Success Rate

According to research at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, age plays a critical role in marital success:

  • Of college grads who wed in the 1980s at 26-plus, 81 percent were still married 20 years later
[Read More]