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Daughter Refuses to Share Skittles

I took my family to a high school football game. During the third quarter, my daughter Landra said, "Dad, can I have some money to buy some candy?" Now I'm not a big candy guy, but I said, "Landra, here's $5. Go and buy some candy." She came back with a sack full of Skittles. As I watched her eat them, I said, "Landra, can I have some Skittles?" She said, "No." I said, "Landra, just give me a couple." She said, "They're mine."

My little daughter didn't understand several things. Number one, she didn't understand the fact that I was the one who bought the Skittles for her. Number two, she didn't realize my strength. I'm strong enough to forcibly take those Skittles from her and eat every one of them. If I wanted to, I could have done that. Number three, she didn't understand that I could have gone to the concession stand, put 300 packages of Skittles on a credit card, come back to her, and given her so many Skittles that she couldn't have eaten them all in a year.

We all have Skittles. Some of us have a pretty nice size pile of Skittles; others have a medium-size pile of Skittles; and some of us have little bags of Skittles. Our loving God comes to us and says, "Would you bring me some Skittles? Just a few Skittles?" What do you think our reaction is? "No! They're mine!" God says, "Just bring me some Skittles." But we still say, "Uh-uh. I made those Skittles. I own those Skittles." Like my daughter, we don't understand several things. God is the one who gave them to us. They're his Skittles. He bought them. In an instant, God could take all of our Skittles. Also, we don't understand that God could rain so many Skittles on our lives, we wouldn't know what to do with them. We couldn't possibly spend or enjoy all of them.

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