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What Great Coaches and Preachers Know (part two)

Use positive and negative sermon elements with purpose. Here is when to be negative.

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Be sure to read the rest of this four-part series:
Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four

Both positive and negative sermon elements are especially effective at accomplishing certain objectives. Let's look at four constructive reasons to use a negative approach.

1. To show our need

Negative preaching takes sin seriously and leads to repentance, thus indirectly bringing the positive results of joy, peace, and life. It is in keeping with the model of Jesus, who clearly honored God's hatred of sin by telling people what not to do.

In his sermon "God Is an Important Person," John Piper used a negative approach to help listeners see their need to honor God:

I've been to church-growth seminars where God is not once mentioned. I've been to lectures and talks on pastoral issues where he is not so much as alluded to. I have read strategies for every kind of recovery under the sun where God is not there. I have talked to students in seminaries who tell me of manifold courses where God is peripheral at best. ...

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What Great Coaches and Preachers Know (part one)

How to use positive and negative sermon elements with purpose.

What Great Coaches and Preachers Know (part three)

Use positive and negative sermon elements with purpose. Here is when to be positive.

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