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Preaching on Race: Why We Can't Wait (Part 2)

How can we speak out faithfully and sensitively on racial issues?

Preaching on Race: Why We Can't Wait (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series Reverend Lawrence Aker, III, senior pastor of the historic Cornerstone Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, explored the issue of preaching on race from the pulpit. Now in Part 2 Matt Woodley talked with Joshua Aaron Moody, pastor of Three Village Church on Long Island. Moody is a white pastor and former police officer, and he will explore this same issue from his ministry context.

Matt Woodley, PreachingToday.com: We know that race issues are a very tense topic in our society today, but let's start with you. How has this issue personally impacted your life?

Joshua Moody: My experience of race issues goes back to growing up in Nashville during the 1980s and early 90s. When desegregation of public schools meant that I was constantly interacting with many people of different races, often in the midst of racial tension, both in their neighborhoods and my own. I grew up with some extended family members who, while being active in their Christian churches, perpetuated ...

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Displaying 1–5 of 7 comments

Marshall Shelley

March 02, 2015  3:37pm

Thanks, Josh. Wise words from a man who has learned from both experience and the Scriptures. The rest of us are grateful for your sharp acuity.

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W. Eugene McCollum

February 25, 2015  4:57pm

Very good message,great reference scriptures

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Ken Shigematsu

February 25, 2015  3:42pm

This is a very wise, powerful, and moving article. It has application not only for preaching on race, but any controversial topic. I highly recommend it!

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AP

February 25, 2015  1:54am

Paternalistic? Why does telling the truth seem repulsive? As a Caucasian Christian, who belongs to a traditional church, its actually time to tell the truth again. Most black / Hispanic people in our congregation would prefer to hear the truth - which is there is a war...a literal war - on the truth; which, in this case is that whites are equally as demoralized as others because the truth is our current leadership is more worried about equal outcome as opposed to equal opportunity. Why would we dare worry about the feelings of the itchy ears when telling our congregations the truth?

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Jacob Buurma

February 24, 2015  4:54pm

Josh's first-hand experience is compelling, his posture of listening before speaking is evident, and his assertion that the cross puts us all on equal footing before God lends helpful perspective to this complex topic.

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